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Which Type of Dental Crown is Right for You?

Author: zburt Posted: May 31st, 2019 Category:

Want a brighter smile, or need to replace a damaged tooth? A dental crown may be the answer.

Some patients are apprehensive about getting a dental crown, but replacing a decayed or broken tooth can actually promote good oral hygiene, strengthen the tooth, and improve your smile. Typically, crowns are used in the case of a large cavity that would require removal of nearly the entire tooth. A crown may also be indicated by root canal treated teeth, fractured, or chipped teeth.

A dental crown or “cap” fully covers the damaged tooth, restoring its size and shape. Your dentist will cement the crown over a portion of the existing tooth to close any gaps between the teeth. A cap provides a new, strong covering over a decayed or discolored tooth, and permits you to chew normally.

Before you receive your dental crown, you’ll work with your dentist to choose a cap tailored for your specific requirements and preferences. If you think you may need a crown, or the treatment has been recommended to you by your dentist, here’s what you should know about preparing for the procedure.

At the Dentist’s Office

During your first visit, the dentist will take X-rays of the tooth and look for any signs of infection that may necessitate a root canal treatment prior to the crown. Then, the damaged tooth will be reshaped to make the perfect fit for your custom crown. A digital scan of the affected tooth, in addition to the teeth above and below, is taken to create the custom crown. In cases where scanning is not an option, a putty impression is sometimes taken as an alternative.

At Espire dental offices, we employ a scanning device that captures a 3D image of the teeth and then shapes a crown from that digital image. This method constructs a crown in one day, so there is no waiting period. If you are not a good candidate for a crown in one day, then at this point, a lab uses the alternative impression to then create a copy of your to fabricate the custom crown from and ship it back to us to cement in permanently.   Lab created crowns are, a process that could take two to four weeks. Before you leave after the first visit, your dentist will fit and adjust a temporary crown over the tooth if needed.

Once the crown has been created, the dentist will check to see how it fits. If it covers the tooth correctly and causes no problem with your bite, the crown is cemented and sealed into place. Depending on the material, a typical crown can be expected to last five to 15 years.

Types of Crowns

Dental crowns come in a variety of materials, including metals, resins, and porcelain, or a combination of these. Each offers varying degrees of strength and durability as well as cosmetic benefits.

Metal Crowns. The most durable crown, metal crowns incorporate gold, nickel, palladium, or chromium. This category ranks as an ideal choice for teeth all the way in the back of the mouth that are exposed to the highest chewing forces.  A negative side to this material is appearance, the metallic color means it will not mimic the esthetics of a natural tooth and is not suited for front teeth.

All-Ceramic or All-Porcelain. If you want a crown that matches your natural tooth color, an all-ceramic or all-porcelain crown would be the preferred option, especially for front teeth. The only drawback of these types of crowns is that they’re less durable than metal crowns and may not last quite as long.

Porcelain and Metal Crowns. Like a porcelain crown, a porcelain-and-metal fusion mimics the hue of your teeth. However, you may see a metal line in the tooth, is not as natural looking, and the porcelain may be susceptible to chips and breaks.  While this type of crown is still used in some offices, it is being phased out by the all ceramic crowns, which are made of stronger glass hybrids like Lithium disilicate or solid zirconia.

All Resin. The least expensive option, resin crowns are more vulnerable to chipping and breakage. Typically the all resin crowns are used as provisional or temporary crowns. 

Choosing the Right Crown

You don’t have to settle for cracked, decayed, or discolored teeth. At Espire Dental, we can help you select the right dental crown and even get you fitted in one visit. Call today to set up an appointment and enjoy a brighter smile.

Want a brighter smile, or need to replace a damaged tooth? A dental crown may be the answer.

Some patients are apprehensive about getting a dental crown, but replacing a decayed or broken tooth can actually promote good oral hygiene, strengthen the tooth, and improve your smile. Typically, crowns are used in the case of a large cavity that would require removal of nearly the entire tooth. A cracked or chipped tooth may also benefit from a crown, as would a tooth treated with a root canal.

A dental crown or “cap” fully covers the damaged tooth, restoring its size and shape. Your dentist will cement the crown over a portion of the existing tooth to close any gaps between the teeth. A cap provides a new, strong covering over a decayed or discolored tooth, and permits you to chew normally.

Before you receive your dental crown, you’ll work with your dentist to choose a cap tailored for your specific requirements and preferences. If you think you may need a crown, or the treatment has been recommended to you by your dentist, here’s what you should know about preparing for the procedure.

At the Dentist’s Office

During your first visit, the dentist will take X-rays of the tooth and look for any signs of infection that may necessitate a root canal. Then, the damaged tooth will be grinded down to make room for the crown. An impression of the affected tooth, in addition to the teeth above and below, is made with a paste- or putty-like substance. This step copies the size of the soon-to-be-crowned tooth and also ensures the crown doesn’t obstruct your bite.

At this point, a lab then will then create a copy of your tooth from the impression and return it to the dentist, a process that could take two weeks. Before you leave after the first visit, your dentist will adjust a temporary crown over the tooth. However, some dental offices employ a scanning device that captures a 3D picture of the tooth and then shapes a crown from that digital image. This method constructs a crown in one day, so there is no waiting period.

Once the crown has been created, the dentist will check to see how it fits. If it covers the tooth correctly and causes no problem with your bite, the crown is sealed into place. Depending on the material, the crown can be expected to last five to 15 years.

Types of Crowns

Dental crowns come in a variety of materials, including metals, resins, and porcelain, or a combination of these. Each offers varying degrees of strength and durability as well as cosmetic benefits.

Metal Crowns. The most durable crown, metal crowns incorporate gold, nickel, palladium, or chromium. This category ranks as an ideal choice for teeth used for chewing and biting since a metal crown offers optimal strength. On the negative side, the metallic color means it’s likely best suited for molars in the back of the mouth.

All-Ceramic or All-Porcelain. If you want a crown that matches your natural tooth color, an all-ceramic or all-porcelain crown would be the preferred option, especially for front teeth. The only drawback of these types of crowns is that they’re less durable than metal crowns and may sometimes irritate surrounding teeth.

Porcelain and Metal Crowns. Like a porcelain crown, a porcelain-and-metal fusion mimics the hue of your teeth. However, you may see a metal line in the tooth, and the porcelain may be susceptible to chips and breaks. On the plus side, porcelain and metal crowns can be placed anywhere in your mouth.

All Resin. The least expensive option, resin crowns are more vulnerable to chipping and breakage. You might want to consider a porcelain and metal crown instead.

Pressed Ceramic. A hard inner core provides durability above that of an all-porcelain crown. There are aesthetic benefits too, since the porcelain overlay can be adapted to look like your natural tooth color.

Choosing the Right Crown

You don’t have to settle for cracked, decayed, or discolored teeth. At Levin Family Dental, we can help you select the right dental crown and even get you fitted in one visit. Call today to set up an appointment and enjoy a brighter smile.